Before shopping for plants based on your USDA Plant Hardiness Zone, please read our in-depth article about Plant Hardiness Zone Maps to understand their uses and their limitations.

Use the official USDA Hardiness Zone Map to determine your zone by zip code.

Read More about Plants for Zone 6

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784 products

784 products

More Information About Plants for Zone 6

Zone 6a and Zone 6b Plants

Many of the perennial plants in our catalog are well-suited for Zones 6a or 6b. Some of our favorite species of acanthus, achillea, agapanthus, agastache, baptisia, brunnera, buddleia, carex, chrysanthemum, coreopsis, delosperma, dentaria, dianthus, echinacea, epimedium, euphorbia, geranium, heuchera, hosta, kniphofia, lilium, lycoris, monarda, paeonia, phlox, polygonatum, podophyllum, rohdea, salvia, solidago and more can survive Zone 4 winter temperatures. Be sure to read how we assign hardiness zones to our plants.

The current USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map was last updated in 2012 and is based on the average annual minimum winter temperature, divided into 10-degree F zones. Each zone is then subdivided into 5-degree F sub-zones. Zone numbers increase as you move from north to south.

Zone 6a annual minimum winter temperatures should be -10 to -5 °F (-23.3 to -20.6 °C). Zone 6b annual minimum temperatures should be -5 to 0 °F (-20.6 to -17.8 °C). Keep in mind that the zone designation does not tell you how many days the area may reach those average minimums. There can also be a major difference between what plants will grow in the 'a' or 'b' sub-zones.