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Draba

Draba (Whitlow-grass)

Draba does not make a good container-garden plant because it tends to be deep rooted and unsuited for pot culture. Draba species tend to bloom in spring with clusters of small white or yellow flowers.

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More Information About Draba

The genus Draba is a brassica (cabbage relative) containing over 370 species of plants that grow primarily in mountainous regions of the northern hemisphere. Draba is the largest genus in family Brassicaceae and is widespread in the wild in a wide variety of habitats. As you might guess, this means Draba is pretty tough and adapts well to tough garden conditions.

The common name Whitlow-grass is a misnomer as Draba is not a real grass. In fact none of the species are even remotely grass-like. Draba species vary widely in form (morphology) and exist as cushions, tufts, rosettes, carpets, sub-shrubs and even shrubs.

Although the genus Draba is thought to have originated in the Caucasus, there is a large contingent of Draba in the US, primarily in the Rockies. The montane habitat of Draba is a hint that it would make a great rock-garden plant. However, unlike many rock-garden plants, Draba does not make a good container-garden plant because it tends to be deep rooted and unsuited for pot culture. Draba species tend to bloom in spring with clusters of small white or yellow flowers in the characteristic brassica form.