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Calydorea

Calydorea (Bartram's Ixia)

Calydorea coelestina flowers are ephemeral, opening at dawn and wilting away by early afternoon. One plant will produce many flowers during the bloom season.

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More Information About Calydorea

The genus Calydorea contains just 12 species of Iris relatives native from Florida south to Argentina. The lone American species, Calydorea coelestina, is commonly called Bartram's Ixia after William Bartram, a prominent plant explorer and naturalist who first wrote about it (as Ixia) in his famous 1791 book Travels through North and South Carolina, Georgia, East and West Florida, the Cherokee Country, etc.

Calydorea coelestina is very rare in its home territory of northeastern Florida, where it resides in pine forests. In the wild, Calydorea coelestina is adapted to fire ecology and blooms best just after a forest fire. Human fire suppression thus has a negative impact on this plant in its native home.

Calydorea coelestina flowers are ephemeral, opening at dawn and wilting away by early afternoon. One plant will produce many flowers during the bloom season. Calydorea species are small...a typical plant is just 1' tall and has very narrow, grass-like leaves. Calydorea flowers, which are borne in late spring through early summer, come in shades of violet, blue, pink, or white.

Calydorea prefers full or part sun, well-drained soil and is otherwise relatively forgiving about its environment. The small size and short bloom time mean that you should plant your Calydorea someplace special where it is easy to see in the morning. This plant does well in containers. When you are ready to buy calydorea for your garden, check out our online offering of calydorea for sale.