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Since 1988, THE source for buying native, rare, and unique perennials.

Only recently have propagation advances made many great perennial euphorbia selections more widely available. New perennial euphorbia cultivars feature leaves that vary from blue-green to powder blue to purple and some are even variegated or splashed with color. Learn how to grow Euphorbia.


More Information About Euphorbia

Although the genus Euphorbia is absolutely gigantic, with over 2000 species running the gamut from cactus-like succulents, to trees and shrubs, to annual weeds, we here at Plant Delights Nursery focus on selling cold hardy perennial species of the genus. Our perennial garden Euphorbias grow well in temperate areas and display lovely textural forms, colorful leaves, and small but colorful and ornamental flowers.

Never to be confused with its flashier sister (the over-the-top poinsettia), or its thorny sister (crown of thorns), hardy perennial euphorbia is prized for its unique chartreuse (sometimes white) flower heads, textural foliage, and wonderful garden structure. 

Only recently have propagation and breeding advances made many great perennial euphorbia selections more widely available. New perennial euphorbia cultivars feature leaves that vary from blue-green to powder blue to purple and some are even variegated or splashed with color. Euphorbia flowers attract butterflies and are unusual and sometimes brightly colored but remain secondary to the attractive stems and leaves.

Like all euphorbia species, our perennial euphorbia cultivars bleed a white latex sap that may irritate the skin, burn the eyes and cause vomiting. We consider this a bonus rather than a problem because deer do not like to eat euphorbia plants. When you are ready to buy euphorbias for your garden, check out our online listing of euphorbias for sale.

 

How to Grow Perennial Euphorbia

Sun: Full Blazing Sun for most (they are tough)...partial sun for a few.

Soil: Well-drained and lean with little fertilizer...almost any pH (did I mention that they are tough?). Euphorbias are great on slopes, raised beds and in rock gardens. They make excellent container plants too.

Water: Most euphorbia plants thrive on drought and neglect (Is that tough enough for you?). Too much water rots them. 

Pests: The latex sap that they contain is an irritant and discourages pests such as deer and rabbits (they are so tough that they fight back!). Insects though will sometimes be a problem...mealy bugs, aphids, spider mites, etc.

Pruning: You can cut stems back almost to the base to trigger new side growth (So tough it can bounce right back). Just watch out for the milky latex sap which is a serious skin irritant in some people. Euphorbias are known to self sow in some climates so you may want to also consider deadheading the spent flowers .